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October 05, 2011

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Dr. Julius Theophilus

Crime. This can destroy a country. The very fabric of our economy assumes that we are a safe country where people can visit, enjoy themselves and contribute to the economy of the Wonderful Bahama Islands. I grew up in Nassau during a time when most Bahamians did not lock their cars or their homes and stealing was a major blemish to one's character. Rape, murder, armed robbery and the like were for all intensive purposes unheard of and if they did occur, the whole country came to a stand still and called on the name of God and His son Jesus Christ to restore order at once. The Nassau I grew up in had less than 12 murders a year and people trembled at the mere sound of the Cat-O-Nine Tail. Respect for your fellow Bahamians and their property was paramount in the Bahamas I grew up in. Tamarine Switch ruled many backsides and we thank God to this day as most of us turned out pretty good and are law abiding. Families in the Bahamas I grew up in looked out for one another and instilled character, strength and virture not only in their children but their neighbors' children also. The Bahamas I grew up in had courts that dealt expediantly with crime of all sorts and justice was swift and effective. The Bahamas I grew up in took pride in the fact that our CRIME level was low and we boasted about the Bahamas being one of the safest countries in the WORLD. Not so today and may Almighty God and His Son Jesus Christ help us all. From my lips to God's Ear.

Eddie

The problem is actually lawyers. They have broken the system and now even them want it fixed.The job of the lawyer is to be an advisor.The only way to repair it is to bring in common folks who will ignore the advisor when he advises them to make him "the chief".

larry smith

Re: Dengue fever. On October 18 Deputy Chief Medical Officer Dr Delon Brennan provided a summary of this summer's epidemic.

He confirmed 7,000 clinical cases, which represented about 20 per cent of those who actually had the disease (but had mild or no symptoms).

Health officials saw the first cases of dengue in early July and the outbreak peaked in late July, when 1477 cases were reported over a two-week period. In August there were 2510 reported cases. Since then the numbers have dwindled, with no confirmed cases this month at all.

Brennan said the Bahamas experienced a dengue fever outbreak every five to eight years.

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